Oh shit - adulthood.
Install Theme

(Source: droqo, via semisurreptitious)

global-fashions:

Ndidi Odogwu - Nigerian Fashion Brand Isi Atagamen “Isimeme” 

Photography: Aham Ibeleme

Styling: Ifan Ifeanyi Michael

Makeup: House of Tara

(via votre-beaute-est-pour-vous)

I can’t believe I just had to sit through a talk by a pastor and hear her actually say out loud that it is okay when men commit adultery but when women do it or begin to indulge in sex for their own satisfaction, it is a no-no

I CANNOT BELIEVE I HAD TO LISTEN TO THAT

I WANT TO BURN EVERYTHING RIGHT NOW

How I’d love to get away from here and be someone else for a while in a place where no-one knows or expects certain things from me.

— Libba Bray (via onlinecounsellingcollege)

(via themonicabird)

anailogico:

Anailogía - Serie: intimidad colectiva (o soledades compartidas).

Hay algo extraño en el contemplar como dos personas se dejan llevar por su instinto y reconstruyen su intimidad a cada beso. Es como ser testigo de un momento, del cual nada más eres un extraño. Un extraño del que pronto ellos se olvidan, porque en la intimidad de una soledad compartida, todos los demás, no somos parte.

Fuji C200

www.anailogi.co

www.instagram.com/anailogico

(via underweartuesday)

(Source: tyutan, via twistedtheory)

This baby lion is so stupidly important to me

(Source: clarkegriffin, via indigoskyes)

http://indigoskyes.tumblr.com/post/93153532044/feministdisney-poppypicklesticks-sjws →

feministdisney:

poppypicklesticks:

SJWs actually believe that the history of Europe from the dawn of civilisation through the Medieval era has been “whitewashed”

Sorry you delusional chucklefucks, but 9th Century Scotland never had the racial dermagraphics of 21st Century New York.

Macbeth wasn’t black. The vikings were not Blasian lesbians. The Bayeux Tapestry was not hand-stitched by morbidly obese black demisexual genderqueer panromantic queerplatonic trans womyn of colour with self diagnosed autism.

futurejournalismproject:

World War I Technology
Via The Atlantic:

When Europe’s armies first marched to war in 1914, some were still carrying lances on horseback. By the end of the war, rapid-fire guns, aerial bombardment, armored vehicle attacks, and chemical weapon deployments were commonplace. Any romantic notion of warfare was bluntly shoved aside by the advent of chlorine gas, massive explosive shells that could have been fired from more than 20 miles away, and machine guns that spat out bullets like firehoses. Each side did its best to build on existing technology, or invent new methods, hoping to gain any advantage over the enemy. Massive listening devices gave them ears in the sky, armored vehicles made them impervious to small arms fire, tanks could (most of the time) cruise right over barbed wire and trenches, telephones and heliographs let them speak across vast distances, and airplanes gave them new platforms to rain death on each other from above. New scientific work resulted in more lethal explosives, new tactics made old offensive methods obsolete, and mass-produced killing machines made soldiers both more powerful and more vulnerable.

Today marks the hundredth anniversary of the start of World War I. Earlier this year, The Atlantic ran a 10-part series of photo essays on different aspects of the war.
Image: “American troops using a newly-developed acoustic locator, mounted on a wheeled platform. The large horns amplified distant sounds, monitored through headphones worn by a crew member, who could direct the platform to move and pinpoint distant enemy aircraft.” Via The Atlantic. Select to embiggen.

futurejournalismproject:

World War I Technology

Via The Atlantic:

When Europe’s armies first marched to war in 1914, some were still carrying lances on horseback. By the end of the war, rapid-fire guns, aerial bombardment, armored vehicle attacks, and chemical weapon deployments were commonplace. Any romantic notion of warfare was bluntly shoved aside by the advent of chlorine gas, massive explosive shells that could have been fired from more than 20 miles away, and machine guns that spat out bullets like firehoses. Each side did its best to build on existing technology, or invent new methods, hoping to gain any advantage over the enemy. Massive listening devices gave them ears in the sky, armored vehicles made them impervious to small arms fire, tanks could (most of the time) cruise right over barbed wire and trenches, telephones and heliographs let them speak across vast distances, and airplanes gave them new platforms to rain death on each other from above. New scientific work resulted in more lethal explosives, new tactics made old offensive methods obsolete, and mass-produced killing machines made soldiers both more powerful and more vulnerable.

Today marks the hundredth anniversary of the start of World War I. Earlier this year, The Atlantic ran a 10-part series of photo essays on different aspects of the war.

Image: “American troops using a newly-developed acoustic locator, mounted on a wheeled platform. The large horns amplified distant sounds, monitored through headphones worn by a crew member, who could direct the platform to move and pinpoint distant enemy aircraft.” Via The Atlantic. Select to embiggen.

I have never made a s’more in my life.

Am I missing out?

thekhooll:

Ponte Vermelha Residence Smerin Architects

(Source: archatlas)